fabriciomora:

Ordos 20+10 Office Building - Preston Scott Cohen

experimentsinmotion:

After the Apocalypse: High Art in a Dark Future

In their “Apocalypse in Art" series, Ukrainian artists Vitaliy and Elena Vasilieva envision the world’s current citadels of art under siege. In a future desolated by environmental disaster, the familiar forms of our cultural landmarks stand out in sharp relief: the New Museum's stacked blocks in a flooded landscape, the Guggenheim's helical galleries nestled among the sand dunes, and the Pompidou Center's exposed infrastructure lit up in a lightning storm. By placing cultural landmarks in imagined post-apocalyptic world, the artists raise questions about the longevity and role of art and the relationship between environment and our cultural artifacts. Even in an apocalyptic future, art lives on, a testament to the power of cultural creation. Indeed, the series suggests that if culture is harnessed to transform how we view and treat the environment, such an end might be averted.

(Source: fastcodesign.com, via ryanpanos)

alma-nac:

Photographs and drawings of our recently completed project the Brick House at Corringham Road. 

Alma-nac 2014

The U.S. cities with the worst climate change-related flooding
John Metcalfe, grist.org
What’s the most pernicious climate-change threat facing the U.S. in the years to come? It might not be lung-scorching air pollution, less-nutritious crops, or super-fueled wildfires, but rising sea levels repeatedly swamping coastal cities, accord…

The U.S. cities with the worst climate change-related flooding
John Metcalfe, grist.org

What’s the most pernicious climate-change threat facing the U.S. in the years to come? It might not be lung-scorching air pollution, less-nutritious crops, or super-fueled wildfires, but rising sea levels repeatedly swamping coastal cities, accord…

(Source: smartercities)

smartercities:

IBM helping China deliver on its ambitious energy and environmental goals

elcontexto:

Peter Zumthor | hortus conclusus

(Source: arkiiv)

dryroastedarch:

superarchitects:

SUBMISSION FOR 1407 BROADWAY COMPETITION
FIRST PLACE, JURY PRIZE 
CAIO BARBOZA, caio.cbarboza@gmail.com
JOSEPH KENNEDY, jhk247@cornell.edu
NATALIE KWEE, natkwee@gmail.com
A new method of spatial organization and information presentation for the workplace of the (near) future, (Print Screen) is a commercial product that can be purchased, shipped and installed in the structural grid of any open floor plan. The package includes a kit of large format industrial printers attached vertically to columns that uses a high-strength, lightweight and soundproof paper (patent pending!) that users can print on and arrange to partition and create spaces that accommodate a variety of uses.
(Print Screen) aims to bring the built environment up to speed with current technologies and create a full integration between architecture and information. (Print Screen) confronts the indeterminacy of the growing business with an adaptable nature that is able to accommodate short term growth and the specific needs of the work environment without sacrificing the ability to personalize one’s own space.
Rather than pinning up paper to a wall, information is printed directly onto the surfaces of the workspace as they are created and deployed. Got an important meeting with several clients? No problem! Just press (Print Screen) and the walls of the conference room are printed with the information for presentation with the space scaled to accommodate it.  When the meeting is over, the walls of the conference room can be taken down and recycled, allowing for different uses to occur in the same space on an abbreviated cycle. With a quick click of the mouse, an entire space can transform from a series of individual cubicles to an open space for a fashion show or event.
(Print Screen) adapts the workspace to respond to the fast flow and instant gratification of information, combining flexible open space with the need for privacy and enclosure at the push of a button.

Congrats!

dryroastedarch:

superarchitects:

SUBMISSION FOR 1407 BROADWAY COMPETITION

FIRST PLACE, JURY PRIZE

CAIO BARBOZA, caio.cbarboza@gmail.com

JOSEPH KENNEDY, jhk247@cornell.edu

NATALIE KWEE, natkwee@gmail.com

A new method of spatial organization and information presentation for the workplace of the (near) future, (Print Screen) is a commercial product that can be purchased, shipped and installed in the structural grid of any open floor plan. The package includes a kit of large format industrial printers attached vertically to columns that uses a high-strength, lightweight and soundproof paper (patent pending!) that users can print on and arrange to partition and create spaces that accommodate a variety of uses.

(Print Screen) aims to bring the built environment up to speed with current technologies and create a full integration between architecture and information. (Print Screen) confronts the indeterminacy of the growing business with an adaptable nature that is able to accommodate short term growth and the specific needs of the work environment without sacrificing the ability to personalize one’s own space.

Rather than pinning up paper to a wall, information is printed directly onto the surfaces of the workspace as they are created and deployed. Got an important meeting with several clients? No problem! Just press (Print Screen) and the walls of the conference room are printed with the information for presentation with the space scaled to accommodate it.  When the meeting is over, the walls of the conference room can be taken down and recycled, allowing for different uses to occur in the same space on an abbreviated cycle. With a quick click of the mouse, an entire space can transform from a series of individual cubicles to an open space for a fashion show or event.

(Print Screen) adapts the workspace to respond to the fast flow and instant gratification of information, combining flexible open space with the need for privacy and enclosure at the push of a button.

Congrats!

(Source: super-architects.com, via entristestropicos)

plansofarchitecture:

Jonathan Woolf Architects, House 101, 2010-2012, London, England

plansofarchitecture:

Jonathan Woolf Architects, House 101, 2010-2012, London, England

(via superarchitects)

alma-nac:

One of Alma-nac’s exciting current projects; the Watch House at Camber Sands. The Watch House responds to the traditional East Sussex vernacular of white shingle clad houses with a bespoke fibre-cement facade

(via archisketchbook)